Last month when I shared the final Daring kitchen challenge, I told you that I was planning on taking on the challenges that I missed or the ones that had happened before I joined the daring kitchen. Once a month, I will make one of the old challenge recipes and post it on the 27th of the month for old times sake (because the 27th was our assigned reveal date when the daring kitchen was active)

If you’d like to join me on this daring adventure, leave me a comment or email me and we can agree on next month’s challenge 🙂 You don’t have to be a blogger or have a blog. You just need to be daring and into trying something new 🙂

As you already know from the title, I chose to make lavash crackers (Sep 2008 challenge). I am addicted to lavash crackers especially the rosemary and sea salt ones and the cinnamon sugar and spice ones. I always buy them whenever I find them (usually at the farmer’s market and sometimes at IKEA). They are always super expensive, especially considering the fact that the ingredients that go into them are so cheap and readily available.Seeds and rosemary lavash crackers.jpg

Whenever I buy lavash crackers, I promise myself to find a great recipe and start making these at home but I never seemed to find the time to do it, until this month! When I went through the extensive Daring kitchen archive to pick a recipe, I came across the lavash crackers challenge and knew that THIS IS THE ONE!

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Isn’t it fascinating how simple ingredients like flour, butter, a pinch of salt and a splash of milk can be used to produce so many different culinary creations?

The more recipes I  learn from different cuisines and cultures, the more enchanting I find human creativity to be. The recipes that come from different cultures carry a bit  of that culture’s essence or soul if you will, making the experience of making those recipes “and of course eating the results” deeper, more profound and more enjoyable.

The February Arabic flavor recipe comes from Kuwait and my experience with exploring the Kuwaiti cuisine has been quite similar to  other Arabic Gulf cuisines, I find myself particularly drawn to the spice profiles of the recipes

Baid al qata (kwaiti cookies stuffed with walnuts , seasoned with rosewater, cinnamon and saffron)

Flaky layered pastry,crackling with every bite, irresistibly decadent no matter what the filling is. Whether you choose cheese, minced beef, chocolate, coconut and raisins, halwa or muhallabieh, this deceivingly simple looking pastry is bound to have you hooked after the first bite.