Creamy eggplant, colorful pepper immersed in a show stopping tomato sauce. The spice blend, vinegar and sugar make it complex with layers of flavor, the perfect canvass for this vegetarian Egyptian moussaka



The part I love the most about exploring any cuisine is trying recipes that I would have never tried or would have never associated with that particular cuisine had it not been for this whole blogging adventure.

Today’s recipe is a great example of that.

Some call it Saudi Pizza, others called aysh abu laham (which literally means meat bread,you see, aysh is bread in the Saudi dialect and laham means meat). A recipe popular in the Hijaz area of Saudi Arabia, particularly in Mecca. This recipe was our Arabic flavor assignment for the month of June.

When Salma (this month’s  host ) revealed the recipe, I honestly had my doubts. Pizza and the traditional Saudi cuisine seemed like an odd mix (I expected a rice based main meal or a date based dessert or a cardamom scented drink) But it turns out that there is so much more to the Saudi cuisine than that just like there is so much more than pizza and pasta in the Italian cuisine

Saudi pizza (meat, tahini and chives galette)

Isn’t it fascinating how simple ingredients like flour, butter, a pinch of salt and a splash of milk can be used to produce so many different culinary creations?

The more recipes I  learn from different cuisines and cultures, the more enchanting I find human creativity to be. The recipes that come from different cultures carry a bit  of that culture’s essence or soul if you will, making the experience of making those recipes “and of course eating the results” deeper, more profound and more enjoyable.

The February Arabic flavor recipe comes from Kuwait and my experience with exploring the Kuwaiti cuisine has been quite similar to  other Arabic Gulf cuisines, I find myself particularly drawn to the spice profiles of the recipes

Baid al qata (kwaiti cookies stuffed with walnuts , seasoned with rosewater, cinnamon and saffron)