Ftoot is a type of bread popular in Palestine. The name ftoot means crumbled and it refers to the crumbled cheese infused through out the bread.

Last year, when I shared the Nabulsi recipe for ftoot ,I promised that I’d share my mum’s recipe for ftoot which is my go to recipe for this bread and it is a little different from the Nabulsi version. Well I’m finally doing that today 🙂 but before I do, allow me to take you on a little trip

I told you in my previous post that we were planning a road trip. Since Eid was on Wednesday we had a long weekend and we decided to take the kids on a road trip to Abu Dhabi the capital of the UAE.

Abu Dhabi is about 270 km from Ras Al Khaima and since the kids and I  have never been to it during our 2 year stay in the UAE, we were really looking forward to the trip.

Abu Dhabi -like Dubai and most major cities in the UAE- is famous for its modern sky scrappers ,shopping mega-centers  and themed amusement parks and though all of that was fun to visit, the part I enjoyed the most in our 3 day trip was our visit to  the city of masdar (the eco friendly city of the future) and our tour in the Sheikh Zayed grand mosque which is a true architectural master piece.

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The part I love the most about exploring any cuisine is trying recipes that I would have never tried or would have never associated with that particular cuisine had it not been for this whole blogging adventure.

Today’s recipe is a great example of that.

Some call it Saudi Pizza, others called aysh abu laham (which literally means meat bread,you see, aysh is bread in the Saudi dialect and laham means meat). A recipe popular in the Hijaz area of Saudi Arabia, particularly in Mecca. This recipe was our Arabic flavor assignment for the month of June.

When Salma (this month’s  host ) revealed the recipe, I honestly had my doubts. Pizza and the traditional Saudi cuisine seemed like an odd mix (I expected a rice based main meal or a date based dessert or a cardamom scented drink) But it turns out that there is so much more to the Saudi cuisine than that just like there is so much more than pizza and pasta in the Italian cuisine

Saudi pizza (meat, tahini and chives galette)

Flaky layered pastry,crackling with every bite, irresistibly decadent no matter what the filling is. Whether you choose cheese, minced beef, chocolate, coconut and raisins, halwa or muhallabieh, this deceivingly simple looking pastry is bound to have you hooked after the first bite.

I love recipes that feature a blend of spices. There is something about the smell and the combination of flavors that I simply can’t resist.

For the month of December, Andrea from 4pure took us on a trip to the Netherlands. She challenged us to take our taste buds on a joyride through the land of sugar and spice by baking three different types of Dutch sweet bread. I chose to make the lightest: peperkoek.

Dutche peperkoek

Peperkoek or Kruidkoek is a Dutch sweet quick bread made with a wonderful blend of warming spices like cloves, cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg. Many recipes also feature succade (candied citrus peel) . Peperkoek is traditionally served at breakfast in Holland with a thick layer of butter on top, as a replacement for regular bread. However due to its sweet taste it is also served as a snack or packed in the kids’ lunch boxes

The November Daring Baker’s challenge took us for a ride! Luisa from Rise of the Sourdough Preacher challenged us to make Paris-Brest, a beautiful pastry celebrating the Paris-Brest bicycle race.

A Paris–Brest is a French dessert, made of choux pastry and a praline flavoured cream.The pastry was created in 1910 to celebrate the Paris–Brest–Paris bicycle race which began in 1891. The Paris brest is always shaped like a circle. The circular shape is supposed to represent the bicycle wheel.